F

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z

Factory Street - Factory Street, named because of the close proximity of the mills, was the site of a 1922 factory strike. Workers protested the lengthening of work hours with a twenty% wage cut. The factories rose due to the Industrial Revolution when it struck Nashua. The Industrial Revolution was a complex system of radical socioeconomic changes, such as the ones that took place in England in the late 18th century, that are brought about when extensive mechanization of production systems results in a shift from home - based hand manufacturing to large - scale factory production.

Fairhaven Road - Fairhaven Road, which is located near the Nashua Country Club derives its name from the city of Fairhaven located in Massachusetts. Fairhaven, a residential town (1990 pop. 16,132), located in SE Massachusetts, is found at the mouth of the Acushnet River on Buzzards Bay, opposite New Bedford; the town was settled in 1670 and was set off from New Bedford and incorporated in 1812. A former whaling center, from which Herman Melville sailed in 1841, Fairhaven has commercial fishing industries, boatyards, and plants making machinery, tires, mattresses, and nails. It is also a summer resort.

Fairland Avenue - Fairland Avenue, named for aesthetic purposes, was titled according to the rich farmland or sod that was present in the area.

Fairmont Street - Fairmont Street, named for aesthetic purposes, originated from various cities across the United States named Fairmont. These cities are located in Indiana, West Virginia, North Carolina, and Minnesota.

Fairview Avenue - The Fair grounds were once located on Fairview Avenue, and the name came from the fair that took place in the general vicinity. A fair is a market exhibition at which producers, traders, and consumers meet either to barter or to buy and sell goods and services. Before the development of transportation and marketing, fairs furnished the primary opportunity for the exchange of merchandise, and served as centers of community social life. Among the ancient Greeks and Romans the days of the public market were also used to announce new public laws. In early Christian times special occasions for marketing were frequently attached to religious gatherings, notably those of pilgrims coming to a town to celebrate a special feast. In the Middle Ages fairs were the major means of exchanging commodities not produced for subsistence. Fairs were incorporated by royal charter and had their own officials, laws, and courts. Major trade routes affected the growth of individual fairs; among the most prominent were those of Geneva, Antwerp, Leipzig, Madrid, Burgundy, Lyons, Bordeaux, Novgorod, and Sturbridge and Bartholomew Fair in England. Of the variety of goods traded at such fairs, cloth was probably the most important. The volume of trade was so great that by the 15th cent. some fair towns became banking centers and were subjected to special regulations. With the breaking of the manorial system, commerce became an expanding and regular part of economic life. Trade fairs declined and to a large extent were replaced by outdoor and indoor general markets. In the 17th cent. pleasure fairs, dominated by entertainments such as plays, became popular. The exposition, combining entertainment and commerce, flourishes today. A variety of advanced industrial wares (such as computers) are exhibited, and important technological innovations are displayed. International trade fairs, devoted solely to commercial display and directed toward businessmen, have also become popular since World War II. Agricultural fairs-held to improve farming methods, stocks, and crops-have been particularly important in the history of the United States. Many states and counties still maintain annual fairs, though some have been discontinued. In recent years, specialized fairs, such as the Frankfurt Book Fair, have taken on international significance.

Fairway Street - Fairway Street, which leads to the Nashua Country Club was named after a fairway or channel either from offshore, in a river, or in a harbor that has enough depth to accommodate the draft of large vessels. In Nautical terms, it is a navigable deep - water channel in a river or harbor or along a coastline. It can also be described as the usual course taken by vessels through a harbor or coastal waters.

Fall Grove Road - Fall Grove Road, named for aesthetic purposes, represents the groves of different fruit trees that were once grown in the area that were cultivated during the fall.

Farley Road - The Farley family, for whom Farley Street is named, had much to do with the history of Nashua and Hollis, NH.

Farmers Trail - Farmers Trail, named for aesthetic purposes, represents the vocation of many citizens of Nashua in the past.

Farmington Road - Farmington Road, located near the Nashua Country Club, gets its name from the city of Farmington located in New Hampshire. Farmington is a town located in Strafford County, New Hampshire. As of the 2000 census, the town had a total population of 5,774. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 97.1 km² (37.5 mi²). 96.2 km² (37.2 mi²) of it is land and 0.9 km² (0.3 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 0.88% water. In the town the population is spread out with 28.1% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 31.0% from 25 to 44, 23.4% from 45 to 64, and 10.3% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 36 years. For every 100 females there are 98.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 96.1 males. The median income for a household in the town is $40,971, and the median income for a family is $44,788. Males have a median income of $32,320 versus $24,527 for females. The per capita income for the town is $16,574. 9.5% of the population and 6.3% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 8.1% are under the age of 18 and 11.2% are 65 or older.

Farmwood Drive - Farmwood Drive was named for aesthetic purposes and indicates the rich farmland that once was present in the vicinity of the street.

Fawn Lane - Fawn Lane was named for aesthetic purposes stemming from a young deer named a fawn which is usually less than a year old or a grayish yellow - brown to moderate reddish brown. The color is found in the scenery on this particular streets and fawns used to reside in the area.

Federal Hill Road - Federal Hill Road is new in the city of Nashua and is parallel to Governor’s Lane. Federal, for which it is named, means of, relating to, or being a form of government in which a union of states recognizes the sovereignty of a central authority while retaining certain residual powers of government.

Fenwick Street - Fenwick Street is located off of Country Hill Road as indicated by records from 1985 but is now located off of Falls Grove Road. The street named after the first owner of the property, Fenwick.

Ferncroft Drive - Ferncroft Drive, located off Watersedge Drive, is parallel to Baymeadow. The name comes from Ferncroft, which is defined as a small meadow or farm full of ferns. It is similar to Watersedge Drive and Baymeadow, all of which are very close to the South of Pennichuck Brook, historically proving the connection between the definition and street name.

Fernwood Street - Located close to Zellwood and Winwood, Fernwood is part of the “wood” development. “Fernwood” means a tract of land filled with ferns, which existed in Nashua before the land was converted into a settlement.

Ferry Avenue - A small avenue off of Ferry Street, Ferry Avenue inherited its name from Ferry Street, which “ferried” people from one side of the river to the other. Ferry Street extends over the Merrimack River and was named for a “ferry,” which carries people or things over a river or body of water.

Ferry Road - Ferry Road is not located over any stretch of water, making the history of the name a mystery. However, the name is most likely related to a street Southeast named Old Mills Drive, which is not located on the water either. None of the other names of the streets near Ferry Road seem to be related to it.

Ferry Street - Ferry Street extends over the Merrimack River and is named after “ferries,” which carry people or things over a river or body of water. Before the bridge on Ferry Street was constructed, there were probably ferries transporting people across the Merrimack River by boat, which led to Ferry Street’s name.

Field Street - The name for Field Street comes from Field’s Grove, a recreational spot where hundreds of Nashua children took swimming lessons from the Red Cross. It was named after the owner of the property, Mr. Field, who allowed children to cut through his property to get to Field’s Grove, by way of Field’s Street.

Fifield Lane/Street - E.O. Fifield, for whom Fifield Lane is named, moved his box - making firm from Tyngsboro to Nashua in 1920. The firm was set up as a large shop on the corner of Taylor and Fifield. The firm later to moved to Milford.

Fir Street - Located off of Dunbarton Drive, Fir Street is new to the city. Its name comes from the tree of the genus Abies, typically large and attractive in appearance, and valued for its wood or resin.

Fireside Drive - Fireside Drive is located in a development with names related to a fireplace and fire. A fireside is defined as the area immediately surrounding a fireplace or hearth. The street runs close to Hearthstone (stone used in the construction of a hearth) and Damper (to extinguish a fire by cutting off air).

Fitzpatrick Circle - Located near McTavish Road, Fitzpatrick Circle also has an Irish name. Fitzpatrick was the name of the family that once owned the small property.

Flagstone Drive - Flagstone Drive extends from High Pine Avenue to Cypress Lane. A “flagstone” can be defined as a slice of Earth turned over by the plow and the street name originated from a prominent family or as a good descriptive title of the land along the road.

Fletcher Way/Street - The names of Fletcher Way and Fletcher Street are rooted in the history of Nashua. A “fletcher” is defined as a maker of arrows, and the streets were named for the arrow remnants of the Pennacook people who resided in the Nashua region before the settlers arrived. The owners of the land or Benjamin Fletcher Jr., the mayor of Nashua from 1881 - 1882 might have also influenced developers naming the streets.

Flintlocke Drive - Flintlocke Drive is located off of Rocky Hill Drive and is named for a “Flintlock,” an old - fashioned gun or pistol used chiefly in the 17th and 18th centuries. It had a flint fixed in the hammer that on striking the battery of the pan ignited the priming which communicated its fire to the charge through the touchhole. It is noteworthy that Pyrite is located right off of Flintlocke, because both of the two streets relate to stones.

Forest Hills Drive - Before the Everette Turnpike existed; Forest Hills Drive only led to half a block of road, houses, and open land. The name itself suggests that the land was dense with trees growing along rolling hills.

Forest Park Drive - Forest Park Drive is located along Fairlane Avenue and Wildwood Lane. The drive is surrounded by open land, which was a park at one time.

Forest Road/Street - Forest Road is a new road, located near forested land. Forest Street extends from Charlotte Avenue into the Edgewood Cemetery and like Forest Road; it was named for the dense area of trees. Forest Street is located in the Civil War region, but also runs parallel to Nutting Street.

Forge Drive - Forge Drive is parallel to Anvil Drive and comes from the word “forge,” which means to form (metal, for example) by heating in a forge and beating or hammering into shape. An “anvil” is a heavy block of iron or steel with a smooth, flat top on which metals are shaped by hammering.

Fossa Avenue - This street was named after the family in possession of the property, as the name Fossa means a small cavity or depression, as in a bone. This definition has no relation to any of the surrounding streets, so it is presumable that the street was named after the property owners.

Foster Court - Foster Court was named for General John G. Foster, an officer from Nashua, NH who took part in the battle on Fort Sumter. After the Civil War ended, Foster returned to his home in Nashua where he was viewed as a hero.

Fotene Street - Fotene Street and surrounding streets were named after the members of the Greek family that bought the property in 1963. Fotene’s Market, located at 717 West Hollis Street near Settlement Way, was also named after the Fotene family.

Foundation Street - Foundation Street is located parallel to Ledge Street and extends from Simon Street to Whipple Street. A foundation is the basis on which something stands or is supported or a base. In this case, house foundations being created on the street might have influenced the developer’s name choice.

Foundry Street - The Nashua Foundry, which provided the inspiration for the name of Foundry Street, is an establishment where metal is melted and poured into molds. On historical documents from 1873, the street was named Hall Street; but by 1883, it was renamed as Foundry Street.

Fountain Lane - Fountain Lane is located in a development based on the legend of Robin Hood. Near the forest, a location that relates to the theme, Fountain Lane is named for Tuck who comes from Fountains Abbey in Yorkshire or Fountaindale in Nottinghamshire.

Fox Meadow Road - Fox Meadow Road, located near Archery Street, Arrow Lane, and Alder Drive (Alder is any of various deciduous shrubs or trees of the genus Alnus, native chiefly to northern temperate regions and having alternate simple toothed leaves and tiny fruits in woody, conelike catkins) was named as part of a development related to nature and hunting.

Fox Street - Fox Street was named for the large fox population in Nashua and extends from Broad Street to Broadview Avenue. There are no streets surrounding Fox Street because it extends out towards the Springfield Terminal and the open land might have once been a prime fox hunting spot of the city.

Foxboro Street - Foxboro Street is surrounded by Aston Street, Woodgate Street, Rowley Street, and Natick Street. All of these streets are named after cities in the United Kingdom.

Foxglove Court - Foxglove Court is located in the plant development. It is with streets such as Heather, Lilac, Rosemary, and Laurel. Foxglove is the common name for about 20 to 30 species of summer - flowering biennial or short - lived perennial herbs in the genus Digitalis, family Scrophulariaceae. They are native to Europe and northwest Africa to central Asia. The common foxglove, D. purpurea, grows to a height of 150 cm (5 ft). Its leaves are alternate, lance - shaped, up to 30 cm (1 ft) long, and hairy above with soft white hairs below. Leaves are tapered at the base to form winged stalks. The flowers droop and are arranged on erect racemes, and its fruit are capsules containing numerous seeds. Common foxglove is found in clearings, in burned areas, and in hilly dry pastures, and it is often grown as an ornamental. Many varieties have been originated through breeding, with flowers varying from white to a deep rose color. The dried leaves, the source of the drug digitalis used for heart trouble, have been used medicinally since as early as the 13th century. Because a single hectare can yield hundreds of kilograms of dried leaves, only a few hundred hectares of land are required to meet the demand for digitalis in medicine.

Foxmoor Circle - Foxmoor Circle is located near in the United Kingdom with Lochmere Lane and Glastonbury Drive. Foxmoor field is located north of Ebley in the county of Gloucester in the United Kingdom.

Franconia Drive - Franconia Drive is located in the NH city and townships development. Franconia Franconia is on the Gale River and rumor has it that the community was named after Sir Francis Bernard an early landholder. Another tale says it was named for the region's resemblance to the Franconian Alps of Germany. Other community names include Indian Head and Morristown .The region once produced pig iron and bar iron for farm tools and cast - iron ware

Franklin Street - Franklin Street extends from Main Street, west to the Springfield Terminal. Franklin Hall was an auditorium built in 1848 on the second floor of the Old City Station on Main and Canal Street and was originally used as a town hall, but later became a popular gathering place. Eventually, Franklin Hall became the Franklin Opera House, a stage show theatre where many famous actors and actresses of the late 1800’s performed, including Denman Thompson and Julia Marlowe. The opera also hosted sporting events like basketball, wrestling, rollerskating, and sometimes even took out the seats for dancing. On April 19, 1931 the building burned down, the same weekend Nashua Theatre on Elm Street destroyed by the fire.

Frederick E. Everett Tpke - Frederick E. Everett Turnpike was named for the first commissioner of the New Hampshire State Highway Department, and connects Nashua, Manchester and Concord to Massachusetts and beyond.

Freedom Street - Freedom Street is located in the NH city development, named for the city, which was incorporated in 1831 following an influx of new settlers from Maine into Effingham. There was a conflict of culture and religion between the new groups and the residents in the seacoast area of Effingham. As a result, a section of that town known as North Effingham was separated to form its own town. The newly incorporated town was appropriately named Freedom. Fremont, Dublin, and Franconia are in the same development.

Fremont Street - Located in the NH city development, Fremont Street is named for the town incorporated in 1764. Fremont was once a part of Exeter known as Poplin, named for an English mill town. The town was renamed Fremont in 1854 for General John C. Fremont, who was the first candidate of the Republican Party in the presidential election of 1856. Benton, in Grafton County, bears the name of Fremont's father - in - law, Senator Thomas Hart Benton.

French Street - By the late 1800’s the region previously called “Indian Head”, located North of the Nashua River, was renamed “French Hill”. The French population was mainly clustered on French Hill and French Village, the area extending from Hollis Street west to Ledge Street. French Street is located in the region that once was French Hill.

Freshwater Court - Freshwater Court is a new road located near to Hassells Brook in a development of nature names. Freshwater refers to the type of water in Hassells Brook and was chosen because of its pleasing name.

Friar Tuck Lane - Friar Tuck Lane is located in the Robin Hood and Sherwood Forest district with other street named for people and places in the legends of Robin Hood. Friar Tuck is described as a rotund and jolly Friar who became an indispensable member of Robin's band. In the ballads, Robin made Friar Tuck carry him across a stream but on the return trip, Tuck drops Robin in the water and the pair began to fight. Eventually, the skirmish reaches a peaceful conclusion and Friar Tuck is asked to join the Merry Men.

Friel Golf Road - Friel Golf Road was named after Phil Friel, a notable amateur golfer. Friel is a New England PGA Hall - of - Famer who recently designed 36 holes of golf at the Green Meadow Gold Club.

Front Street - Front Street is located off Locust Street in 1883 between the Nashua River and the Railroad. Front Street is a residential circle with a view of the river, named Front Street because its close proximity to the waterfront.

Frost Drive - Frost Drive is located near Hampton Drive and Belfast Street and was named for Robert Frost, an American poet from Derry, NH whose deceptively simple works, often set in rural New England, explore the relationships between individuals and between people and nature. His collections include A Boy's Will (1913) and In the Clearing (1962). He won a Pulitzer Prize in 1924, 1931, 1937, and 1943. F

Factory Street - Factory Street, named because of the close proximity of the mills, was the site of a 1922 factory strike. Workers protested the lengthening of work hours with a twenty% wage cut. The factories rose due to the Industrial Revolution when it struck Nashua. The Industrial Revolution was a complex system of radical socioeconomic changes, such as the ones that took place in England in the late 18th century, that are brought about when extensive mechanization of production systems results in a shift from home - based hand manufacturing to large - scale factory production.

Fairhaven Road - Fairhaven Road, which is located near the Nashua Country Club derives its name from the city of Fairhaven located in Massachusetts. Fairhaven, a residential town (1990 pop. 16,132), located in SE Massachusetts, is found at the mouth of the Acushnet River on Buzzards Bay, opposite New Bedford; the town was settled in 1670 and was set off from New Bedford and incorporated in 1812. A former whaling center, from which Herman Melville sailed in 1841, Fairhaven has commercial fishing industries, boatyards, and plants making machinery, tires, mattresses, and nails. It is also a summer resort.

Fairland Avenue - Fairland Avenue, named for aesthetic purposes, was titled according to the rich farmland or sod that was present in the area.

Fairmont Street - Fairmont Street, named for aesthetic purposes, originated from various cities across the United States named Fairmont. These cities are located in Indiana, West Virginia, North Carolina, and Minnesota.

Fairview Avenue - The Fair grounds were once located on Fairview Avenue, and the name came from the fair that took place in the general vicinity. A fair is a market exhibition at which producers, traders, and consumers meet either to barter or to buy and sell goods and services. Before the development of transportation and marketing, fairs furnished the primary opportunity for the exchange of merchandise, and served as centers of community social life. Among the ancient Greeks and Romans the days of the public market were also used to announce new public laws. In early Christian times special occasions for marketing were frequently attached to religious gatherings, notably those of pilgrims coming to a town to celebrate a special feast. In the Middle Ages fairs were the major means of exchanging commodities not produced for subsistence. Fairs were incorporated by royal charter and had their own officials, laws, and courts. Major trade routes affected the growth of individual fairs; among the most prominent were those of Geneva, Antwerp, Leipzig, Madrid, Burgundy, Lyons, Bordeaux, Novgorod, and Sturbridge and Bartholomew Fair in England. Of the variety of goods traded at such fairs, cloth was probably the most important. The volume of trade was so great that by the 15th cent. some fair towns became banking centers and were subjected to special regulations. With the breaking of the manorial system, commerce became an expanding and regular part of economic life. Trade fairs declined and to a large extent were replaced by outdoor and indoor general markets. In the 17th cent. pleasure fairs, dominated by entertainments such as plays, became popular. The exposition, combining entertainment and commerce, flourishes today. A variety of advanced industrial wares (such as computers) are exhibited, and important technological innovations are displayed. International trade fairs, devoted solely to commercial display and directed toward businessmen, have also become popular since World War II. Agricultural fairs-held to improve farming methods, stocks, and crops-have been particularly important in the history of the United States. Many states and counties still maintain annual fairs, though some have been discontinued. In recent years, specialized fairs, such as the Frankfurt Book Fair, have taken on international significance.

Fairway Street - Fairway Street, which leads to the Nashua Country Club was named after a fairway or channel either from offshore, in a river, or in a harbor that has enough depth to accommodate the draft of large vessels. In Nautical terms, it is a navigable deep - water channel in a river or harbor or along a coastline. It can also be described as the usual course taken by vessels through a harbor or coastal waters.

Fall Grove Road - Fall Grove Road, named for aesthetic purposes, represents the groves of different fruit trees that were once grown in the area that were cultivated during the fall.

Farley Road - The Farley family, for whom Farley Street is named, had much to do with the history of Nashua and Hollis, NH.

Farmers Trail - Farmers Trail, named for aesthetic purposes, represents the vocation of many citizens of Nashua in the past.

Farmington Road - Farmington Road, located near the Nashua Country Club, gets its name from the city of Farmington located in New Hampshire. Farmington is a town located in Strafford County, New Hampshire. As of the 2000 census, the town had a total population of 5,774. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 97.1 km² (37.5 mi²). 96.2 km² (37.2 mi²) of it is land and 0.9 km² (0.3 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 0.88% water. In the town the population is spread out with 28.1% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 31.0% from 25 to 44, 23.4% from 45 to 64, and 10.3% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 36 years. For every 100 females there are 98.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 96.1 males. The median income for a household in the town is $40,971, and the median income for a family is $44,788. Males have a median income of $32,320 versus $24,527 for females. The per capita income for the town is $16,574. 9.5% of the population and 6.3% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 8.1% are under the age of 18 and 11.2% are 65 or older.

Farmwood Drive - Farmwood Drive was named for aesthetic purposes and indicates the rich farmland that once was present in the vicinity of the street.

Fawn Lane - Fawn Lane was named for aesthetic purposes stemming from a young deer named a fawn which is usually less than a year old or a grayish yellow - brown to moderate reddish brown. The color is found in the scenery on this particular streets and fawns used to reside in the area.

Federal Hill Road - Federal Hill Road is new in the city of Nashua and is parallel to Governor’s Lane. Federal, for which it is named, means of, relating to, or being a form of government in which a union of states recognizes the sovereignty of a central authority while retaining certain residual powers of government.

Fenwick Street - Fenwick Street is located off of Country Hill Road as indicated by records from 1985 but is now located off of Falls Grove Road. The street named after the first owner of the property, Fenwick.

Ferncroft Drive - Ferncroft Drive, located off Watersedge Drive, is parallel to Baymeadow. The name comes from Ferncroft, which is defined as a small meadow or farm full of ferns. It is similar to Watersedge Drive and Baymeadow, all of which are very close to the South of Pennichuck Brook, historically proving the connection between the definition and street name.

Fernwood Street - Located close to Zellwood and Winwood, Fernwood is part of the “wood” development. “Fernwood” means a tract of land filled with ferns, which existed in Nashua before the land was converted into a settlement.

Ferry Avenue - A small avenue off of Ferry Street, Ferry Avenue inherited its name from Ferry Street, which “ferried” people from one side of the river to the other. Ferry Street extends over the Merrimack River and was named for a “ferry,” which carries people or things over a river or body of water.

Ferry Road - Ferry Road is not located over any stretch of water, making the history of the name a mystery. However, the name is most likely related to a street Southeast named Old Mills Drive, which is not located on the water either. None of the other names of the streets near Ferry Road seem to be related to it.

Ferry Street - Ferry Street extends over the Merrimack River and is named after “ferries,” which carry people or things over a river or body of water. Before the bridge on Ferry Street was constructed, there were probably ferries transporting people across the Merrimack River by boat, which led to Ferry Street’s name.

Field Street - The name for Field Street comes from Field’s Grove, a recreational spot where hundreds of Nashua children took swimming lessons from the Red Cross. It was named after the owner of the property, Mr. Field, who allowed children to cut through his property to get to Field’s Grove, by way of Field’s Street.

Fifield Lane/Street - E.O. Fifield, for whom Fifield Lane is named, moved his box - making firm from Tyngsboro to Nashua in 1920. The firm was set up as a large shop on the corner of Taylor and Fifield. The firm later to moved to Milford.

Fir Street - Located off of Dunbarton Drive, Fir Street is new to the city. Its name comes from the tree of the genus Abies, typically large and attractive in appearance, and valued for its wood or resin.

Fireside Drive - Fireside Drive is located in a development with names related to a fireplace and fire. A fireside is defined as the area immediately surrounding a fireplace or hearth. The street runs close to Hearthstone (stone used in the construction of a hearth) and Damper (to extinguish a fire by cutting off air).

Fitzpatrick Circle - Located near McTavish Road, Fitzpatrick Circle also has an Irish name. Fitzpatrick was the name of the family that once owned the small property.

Flagstone Drive - Flagstone Drive extends from High Pine Avenue to Cypress Lane. A “flagstone” can be defined as a slice of Earth turned over by the plow and the street name originated from a prominent family or as a good descriptive title of the land along the road.

Fletcher Way/Street - The names of Fletcher Way and Fletcher Street are rooted in the history of Nashua. A “fletcher” is defined as a maker of arrows, and the streets were named for the arrow remnants of the Pennacook people who resided in the Nashua region before the settlers arrived. The owners of the land or Benjamin Fletcher Jr., the mayor of Nashua from 1881 - 1882 might have also influenced developers naming the streets.

Flintlocke Drive - Flintlocke Drive is located off of Rocky Hill Drive and is named for a “Flintlock,” an old - fashioned gun or pistol used chiefly in the 17th and 18th centuries. It had a flint fixed in the hammer that on striking the battery of the pan ignited the priming which communicated its fire to the charge through the touchhole. It is noteworthy that Pyrite is located right off of Flintlocke, because both of the two streets relate to stones.

Forest Hills Drive - Before the Everette Turnpike existed; Forest Hills Drive only led to half a block of road, houses, and open land. The name itself suggests that the land was dense with trees growing along rolling hills.

Forest Park Drive - Forest Park Drive is located along Fairlane Avenue and Wildwood Lane. The drive is surrounded by open land, which was a park at one time.

Forest Road/Street - Forest Road is a new road, located near forested land. Forest Street extends from Charlotte Avenue into the Edgewood Cemetery and like Forest Road; it was named for the dense area of trees. Forest Street is located in the Civil War region, but also runs parallel to Nutting Street.

Forge Drive - Forge Drive is parallel to Anvil Drive and comes from the word “forge,” which means to form (metal, for example) by heating in a forge and beating or hammering into shape. An “anvil” is a heavy block of iron or steel with a smooth, flat top on which metals are shaped by hammering.

Fossa Avenue - This street was named after the family in possession of the property, as the name Fossa means a small cavity or depression, as in a bone. This definition has no relation to any of the surrounding streets, so it is presumable that the street was named after the property owners.

Foster Court - Foster Court was named for General John G. Foster, an officer from Nashua, NH who took part in the battle on Fort Sumter. After the Civil War ended, Foster returned to his home in Nashua where he was viewed as a hero.

Fotene Street - Fotene Street and surrounding streets were named after the members of the Greek family that bought the property in 1963. Fotene’s Market, located at 717 West Hollis Street near Settlement Way, was also named after the Fotene family.

Foundation Street - Foundation Street is located parallel to Ledge Street and extends from Simon Street to Whipple Street. A foundation is the basis on which something stands or is supported or a base. In this case, house foundations being created on the street might have influenced the developer’s name choice.

Foundry Street - The Nashua Foundry, which provided the inspiration for the name of Foundry Street, is an establishment where metal is melted and poured into molds. On historical documents from 1873, the street was named Hall Street; but by 1883, it was renamed as Foundry Street.

Fountain Lane - Fountain Lane is located in a development based on the legend of Robin Hood. Near the forest, a location that relates to the theme, Fountain Lane is named for Tuck who comes from Fountains Abbey in Yorkshire or Fountaindale in Nottinghamshire.

Fox Meadow Road - Fox Meadow Road, located near Archery Street, Arrow Lane, and Alder Drive (Alder is any of various deciduous shrubs or trees of the genus Alnus, native chiefly to northern temperate regions and having alternate simple toothed leaves and tiny fruits in woody, conelike catkins) was named as part of a development related to nature and hunting.

Fox Street - Fox Street was named for the large fox population in Nashua and extends from Broad Street to Broadview Avenue. There are no streets surrounding Fox Street because it extends out towards the Springfield Terminal and the open land might have once been a prime fox hunting spot of the city.

Foxboro Street - Foxboro Street is surrounded by Aston Street, Woodgate Street, Rowley Street, and Natick Street. All of these streets are named after cities in the United Kingdom.

Foxglove Court - Foxglove Court is located in the plant development. It is with streets such as Heather, Lilac, Rosemary, and Laurel. Foxglove is the common name for about 20 to 30 species of summer - flowering biennial or short - lived perennial herbs in the genus Digitalis, family Scrophulariaceae. They are native to Europe and northwest Africa to central Asia. The common foxglove, D. purpurea, grows to a height of 150 cm (5 ft). Its leaves are alternate, lance - shaped, up to 30 cm (1 ft) long, and hairy above with soft white hairs below. Leaves are tapered at the base to form winged stalks. The flowers droop and are arranged on erect racemes, and its fruit are capsules containing numerous seeds. Common foxglove is found in clearings, in burned areas, and in hilly dry pastures, and it is often grown as an ornamental. Many varieties have been originated through breeding, with flowers varying from white to a deep rose color. The dried leaves, the source of the drug digitalis used for heart trouble, have been used medicinally since as early as the 13th century. Because a single hectare can yield hundreds of kilograms of dried leaves, only a few hundred hectares of land are required to meet the demand for digitalis in medicine.

Foxmoor Circle - Foxmoor Circle is located near in the United Kingdom with Lochmere Lane and Glastonbury Drive. Foxmoor field is located north of Ebley in the county of Gloucester in the United Kingdom.

Franconia Drive - Franconia Drive is located in the NH city and townships development. Franconia Franconia is on the Gale River and rumor has it that the community was named after Sir Francis Bernard an early landholder. Another tale says it was named for the region's resemblance to the Franconian Alps of Germany. Other community names include Indian Head and Morristown .The region once produced pig iron and bar iron for farm tools and cast - iron ware

Franklin Street - Franklin Street extends from Main Street, west to the Springfield Terminal. Franklin Hall was an auditorium built in 1848 on the second floor of the Old City Station on Main and Canal Street and was originally used as a town hall, but later became a popular gathering place. Eventually, Franklin Hall became the Franklin Opera House, a stage show theatre where many famous actors and actresses of the late 1800’s performed, including Denman Thompson and Julia Marlowe. The opera also hosted sporting events like basketball, wrestling, rollerskating, and sometimes even took out the seats for dancing. On April 19, 1931 the building burned down, the same weekend Nashua Theatre on Elm Street destroyed by the fire.

Frederick E. Everett Turnpike
- Frederick E. Everett Turnpike was named for the first commissioner of the New Hampshire State Highway Department, and connects Nashua, Manchester and Concord to Massachusetts and beyond.

Freedom Street - Freedom Street is located in the NH city development, named for the city, which was incorporated in 1831 following an influx of new settlers from Maine into Effingham. There was a conflict of culture and religion between the new groups and the residents in the seacoast area of Effingham. As a result, a section of that town known as North Effingham was separated to form its own town. The newly incorporated town was appropriately named Freedom. Fremont, Dublin, and Franconia are in the same development.

Fremont Street - Located in the NH city development, Fremont Street is named for the town incorporated in 1764. Fremont was once a part of Exeter known as Poplin, named for an English mill town. The town was renamed Fremont in 1854 for General John C. Fremont, who was the first candidate of the Republican Party in the presidential election of 1856. Benton, in Grafton County, bears the name of Fremont's father-in-law, Senator Thomas Hart Benton.

French Street - By the late 1800’s the region previously called “Indian Head”, located North of the Nashua River, was renamed “French Hill”. The French population was mainly clustered on French Hill and French Village, the area extending from Hollis Street west to Ledge Street. French Street is located in the region that once was French Hill.

Freshwater Court - Freshwater Court is a new road located near to Hassells Brook in a development of nature names. Freshwater refers to the type of water in Hassells Brook and was chosen because of its pleasing name.

Friar Tuck Lane - Friar Tuck Lane is located in the Robin Hood and Sherwood Forest district with other street named for people and places in the legends of Robin Hood. Friar Tuck is described as a rotund and jolly Friar who became an indispensable member of Robin's band. In the ballads, Robin made Friar Tuck carry him across a stream but on the return trip, Tuck drops Robin in the water and the pair began to fight. Eventually, the skirmish reaches a peaceful conclusion and Friar Tuck is asked to join the Merry Men.

Friel Golf Road - Friel Golf Road was named after Phil Friel, a notable amateur golfer. Friel is a New England PGA Hall-of- Famer who recently designed 36 holes of golf at the Green Meadow Gold Club.

Front Street - Front Street is located off Locust Street in 1883 between the Nashua River and the Railroad. Front Street is a residential circle with a view of the river, named Front Street because its close proximity to the waterfront.

Frost Drive - Frost Drive is located near Hampton Drive and Belfast Street and was named for Robert Frost, an American poet from Derry, NH whose deceptively simple works, often set in rural New England, explore the relationships between individuals and between people and nature. His collections include A Boy's Will (1913) and In the Clearing (1962). He won a Pulitzer Prize in 1924, 1931, 1937, and 1943.