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E Street - The mill housing that rose in Nashua during the time of the Industrial Revolution designates the name of E street.

Earley Street - Earley Street was named after the Earley family that inhabited the town of Nashua in the past.

Eaton Place - Eaton and Ayre, successful entrepreneurs and business associates that created a partnership together, ran a flourishing bobbin business in the late 1800s. The factory created by both businessmen employed nearly 250 workers and sold bobbins as far away as England. A bobbin, an implement on which thread is wound, is often used in sewing, spinning, weaving, and lace making. Sometimes the wooden spools of sewing thread are called bobbins. The bobbin of a sewing machine is a metal cylinder, with a flange at each end, on which the lower thread is wound to be carried through the shuttle to the seam. In some primitive hand weaving, the weft, or woof, was wound on a bobbin flanged at one end and passed or carried by it through the warp. In tapestry weaving, bobbin looms are essential, as weft strands of different colors must go back and forth for the distance required by the design, somewhat in the manner of an embroidery needle darning in a pattern. In making pillow lace, bobbins form an important part of the equipment, as each thread of the pattern requires a different bobbin; intricate patterns call for hundreds of bobbins to hold the fine thread in order. Bobbins for lace making are made in various shapes and sizes, from a variety of materials, as walnut, rosewood, boxwood, and olive wood, glass, metal, ivory, coral, malachite, and bamboo, and are ornamented with carving, painting, or engraving.

Echo Avenue - Echo Avenue is located beside Twilight Drive. An echo, a reflection of a sound wave back to its source in sufficient strength and with a sufficient time lag to be separately distinguished, signifies the origin of this particular street name. If a sound wave returns within 1/10 sec, the human ear is incapable of distinguishing it from the original one. Thus, since the velocity of sound is c.344 m (1,130 ft) per sec at a normal room temperature of about 20°C (68°F), a reflecting wall must be more than 16.2 m (561/2 ft) from the sound source at this temperature for an echo to be heard by a person at the source. In this case the sound requires 1/20 sec to reach the reflecting surface and the same time to return. Bats navigate by listening for the echo of their high - frequency cry. Sonar and depth sounders work by analyzing electronically the echo time lag of sound waves, generally between 10 and 50 kilohertz, produced by underwater transducers. Radar sets broadcast radio waves, usually between 100 and 10,000 megahertz, pick up the portion reflected back by objects, and electronically determine the distance and direction of the objects. A sound echo that is reflected again and again from different surfaces, as by parallel walls in a tunnel, is called reverberation. When a surface reflects sound it partially absorbs and partially reflects the energy. As the process is repeated the sound becomes weaker and weaker and eventually ceases.

Edgewood Avenue - Edgewood Avenue, named for aesthetic purposes, originates from the location of the avenue beside woodland.

Edmatteric Drive - Edmatteric Drive is a combination of three names of the developer’s sons, Edward, Matthew, and Eric.

Edson Street - Edson Hill was a state and national legislator from New Hampshire and Edson Street was named in his honor. Edson Hill was the eighth child in his family. He went to "common school" in Northwood, then went to live in the household of Judge Harvey, a prominent local citizen. With Harvey's help Hill began to rise in local politics. He served as town clerk, moderator and town agent for Northwood, before becoming a town selectman (1836/7). He became a State Representative for Northwood (1839/40), and also served as postmaster for some years. In 1864 Manchester's Amoskeag Bank was merged into the Amoskeag National Bank; Hill was named director of the new bank. In 1867 Hill moved back to Manchester, and he lived in Manchester the rest of his life. He served a one year term as State Representative (1870), and he was an elector on the 1876 (Republican) Tilden - Hendricks presidential ticket; but most of Hill's time was given to the Amoskeag National Bank. He was also a trustee of Amoskeag Savings Bank, and People's Savings Bank. Hill was also a director of the Concord Railroad, and an associate of the international financier and Newport (NH) millionaire Austin Corbin.

Edwards Avenue - Edwards Avenue was named after Edward Tyng, who owned considerable tracts of land in the area. His son inherited 3000 acres in 1668 which was later named Dunstable. Edward Tyng may have been involved in the battle at Moore’s Brook in Scarborough, Maine on June 29, 1677.

Edwards Street - Edwards Avenue was named after Edward Tyng, who owned considerable tracts of land in the area. His son inherited 3000 acres in 1668 which was later named Dunstable. Edward Tyng may have been involved in the battle at Moore’s Brook in Scarborough, Maine on June 29, 1677.

Edwin Street - Edwin Street was named for Edwin and Joseph Baldwin, who started making bobbins in a small shop behind their father’s farm house. The business was sold to Eaton and Ayre who were also successful in the bobbin business.

Eldorado Circle - Eldorado Circle is named for Eldorado, which is “an imaginary place of great wealth and opportunity”. The street is also near Silverton Drive, and both relate to prosperity and assets. It is also in a district of Nashua with Western - influenced names.

Elm Court - Elm Court is located in a development in Nashua with names of streets. Elm trees were abundant in the area. The elm tree, the common name for the Ulmaceae, a family of trees and shrubs chiefly of the Northern Hemisphere, is the origin of the name of this street. Elm trees (genus Ulmus) have a limited use as hardwoods for timber, especially the rock or cork elm (U. thomasi). Tall and graceful, with fan - shaped crowns of finely subdividing branches and twigs, elms are widely planted as ornamental and shade trees, chiefly the American, or white, elm (U. americana) and the English, or Wych, elm (U. campestris) of N and central Europe and W Asia. Tolerant of urban conditions, both species are among those plants attacked by the fungus known as Dutch elm disease, but disease - tolerant varieties have been propagated. The mucilaginous inner bark of the slippery elm (U. fulva) is used medicinally in cough drops. Some species of the genus Celtis (the hackberries of America and the nettle trees of the Old World) are cultivated for their edible fruit. False sandalwood (Planera aquatica) is a member of the elm family; its fragrant wood is used in cabinetmaking. The elm family is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Urticales.

Elm Street - Elm Court is located in a development in Nashua with names of streets. Elm trees were abundant in the area. The elm tree, the common name for the Ulmaceae, a family of trees and shrubs chiefly of the Northern Hemisphere, is the origin of the name of this street. Elm trees (genus Ulmus) have a limited use as hardwoods for timber, especially the rock or cork elm (U. thomasi). Tall and graceful, with fan - shaped crowns of finely subdividing branches and twigs, elms are widely planted as ornamental and shade trees, chiefly the American, or white, elm (U. americana) and the English, or Wych, elm (U. campestris) of N and central Europe and W Asia. Tolerant of urban conditions, both species are among those plants attacked by the fungus known as Dutch elm disease, but disease - tolerant varieties have been propagated. The mucilaginous inner bark of the slippery elm (U. fulva) is used medicinally in cough drops. Some species of the genus Celtis (the hackberries of America and the nettle trees of the Old World) are cultivated for their edible fruit. False sandalwood (Planera aquatica) is a member of the elm family; its fragrant wood is used in cabinetmaking. The elm family is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Urticales.

Emerson Road - Ralph Waldo Emerson, a poet of the 1800s was the inspiration for Emerson Road. It is part of a district of poet streets. Emerson's father was the seventh in an unbroken line of ministers dating back to Puritan days, and after attending Harvard Emerson himself became a Unitarian minister. After the death of his young wife and two elder brothers, Emerson began to doubt his faith and in 1832 resigned his ministry. Eventually he settled in Concord, Massachusetts, where he lived most of the rest of his life thinking, writing and speaking. Emerson remains important in American history as a founder of the school of thought known as Transcendentalism. Its chief features were a reliance on intuition over cold scientific reason, a belief that the natural world held spiritual truths, and an optimistic view of the human spirit. Emerson was known as a stirring speaker, eventually earning the sobriquet "the Sage of Concord."

Epping Street - Epping, NH, for which Epping Street is named, is also a city in the United Kingdom. It is part of a development with names of New Hampshire and European cities. Epping is a place in the Epping Forest district of the county of Essex near London, England. On census day 2001, the district of Epping Forest had a population of approximately 120,900. Epping is home to the Epping Forest. The city of Epping is widely popular in Germany for being the home of Peter, David, Betty and Helga, protagonists of many textbooks used to teach English to German children.

Erie Circle - Erie Circle is named for a battle during the War of 1812 and is located in a district of streets including Chesapeake, Baltimore and Delaware Roads, all of which played an important part in the outcome of the war. The Siege of Fort Erie was the last engagement between British and American forces during the Niagara campaign of 1814, in which the Americans made a successful defense of the fort against the British before abandoning it on November 5, 1814. After the bloody Battle of Lundy's Lane, the American forces now under the command of Eleazer Ripley (Brown had been severely wounded at Lundy's Lane), withdrew to their base at Fort Erie. Once the American army reached the fort, command was given to Brigadier General Edmund P. Gaines. The British under the command of Gordon Drummond followed slowly behind but reached the fort on August 4. The Americans had captured Fort Erie on July 3, 1814 and had made significant improvements to the defenses since then.

Essex Street - Essex Street, is named for Essex, UK, famous for its thriving industries. It is located in a development with names from European cities. Essex county, a county with an area of 1,520 sq mi (3,938 sq km) and located in SE England, is found on the Thames River and the North Sea. It is one of the “Home Counties” of London. Chelmsford is the county seat. The land rises from the low, irregular coastline to undulating pastoral country. Streams and salt marshes are plentiful. The chief crops of Essex are wheat, barley, sugar beets, potatoes, fruits, and vegetables. There is market gardening for London and some dairy and sheep farming. Oyster fisheries are also important. Industries include petroleum refining, chemicals, machinery, textiles, cement, processed foods, electrical goods, and nuclear power generation. Essex was once part of the kingdom of the East Saxons; Roman and Saxon remains are at Colchester and Maldon. Popular resorts line the coast.

Euclid Lane - Euclid of Alexandria was a mathematician for whom Euclid Lane was named. Euclid Lane is in a district of Nashua with streets named after mathematicians. Euclid of Alexandria was a well - known Greek mathematician. Little is known of his life other than the fact that he taught at Alexandria, being associated with the school that grew up there in the late 4th cent. B.C. He is famous for his Elements, a presentation in thirteen books of the geometry and other mathematics known in his day. The first six books cover elementary plane geometry and have served since as the basis for most beginning courses on this subject. The other books of the Elements treat the theory of numbers and certain problems in arithmetic (on a geometric basis) and solid geometry, including the five regular polyhedra, or Platonic solids. The great contribution of Euclid was his use of a deductive system for the presentation of mathematics. Primary terms, such as point and line, are defined; unproved assumptions, or postulates, regarding these terms are stated; and a series of statements are then deduced logically from the definitions and postulates. Although Euclid's system no longer satisfies modern requirements of logical rigor, its importance in influencing the direction and method of the development of mathematics is undisputed. One consequence of the critical examination of Euclid's system was the discovery in the early 19th cent. that his fifth postulate, equivalent to the statement that one and only one line parallel to a given line can be drawn through a point external to the line, can not be proved from the other postulates; on the contrary, by substituting a different postulate for this parallel postulate two different self - consistent forms of non - Euclidean geometry were deduced, one by Nikolai I. Lobachevsky (1826) and independently by János Bolyai (1832) and another by Bernhard Riemann (1854). A few modern historians have questioned Euclid's authorship of the Elements, but he is definitely known to have written other works, most notably the Optics.

Everett Street - Everett Street was named for Fredrick E. Everett and his family in Nashua.